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Paleo Spaghetti Sauce

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Last Updated on July 24, 2020

I recently discovered Zucchini Noodles. Once that happened, I knew I had to find a paleo spaghetti sauce to go on it. Then I thought “That’s dumb, I could just make my own”. I happened to have a bunch of tomato products in the pantry one day so I grabbed what I had and made a sauce for my new pasta recipe. And it was a fantastic taste! Too bad I didn’t have enough zucchini to make spaghetti for the family, so I ate it all myself. I’m generous like that.

This paleo spaghetti sauce recipe makes approximately 8 cups of paleo friendly delicious sauce, so cut in half if you won’t need that much. OR, you could preserve the rest by canning it, if you’re into that sort of thing.

  • Sterilize your jars, lids, and rings.
  • Fill the jars to within ¼-inch of the top, seat the lid and hand-tighten the ring around them.
  • Put the jars in a canner and keep them covered with at least 1 inch of water.
  • Keep the water boiling.
  • Process the jars in a boiling-water bath for 35 minutes for pints and 40 minutes for quarts.
Paleo Spaghetti Sauce | Our Paleo Life

Paleo Spaghetti Sauce

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 lb Ground Meat, Beef, Italian Sausage, Turkey, Bison, etc.
  • 1 Yellow Onion, diced
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1 (15 oz) can Tomato Sauce
  • 2 (14 oz) can Diced Tomatoes, drained, juice reserved
  • 1 (6 oz) can Tomato Paste
  • 1 Tbsp Dried Basil
  • 1 tsp Dried Oregano
  • 2-1/2 Tbsp Garlic Powder
  • 2 Tbsp Onion Powder
  • 1 Tbsp Italian Seasoning
  • 1-2 tsp Sea Salt, start with 1 tsp, add more if you like it saltier

Instructions

  1. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, brown the ground meat until cooked through. Drain excess fat.
  2. Reduce heat to medium and add diced onion and garlic to the meat. Cook until onions are slightly translucent, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, and tomato paste and stir to mix well.
  4. Add basil, oregano, garlic powder, onion powder, Italian seasoning, and salt. Stir well to combine.
  5. Reduce heat to Low, cover, and let simmer for about 1 hour. If you can wait 2 hours, that’s even better. The flavors will mix together even more.
  6. If your sauce is too thick, you can add some of that reserved juice from the diced tomatoes. I found that I didn’t need to but it’s a personal preference.
  7. Serve over Zucchini Noodles for the perfect Paleo Spaghetti.
Nutrition Information
Serving Size 1 g
Amount Per Serving Unsaturated Fat 0g

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Jessica

Friday 31st of January 2020

Has anyone done this in a slow cooker?

Sandy C

Wednesday 8th of May 2019

Just wanted to comment on the garlic. I’m not sure why you would use powdered garlic when fresh garlic is already in there. I would consider just you fresh garlic to the likeness of your garlic flavor and leave out the powdered. Same with the onion powder. It has onion so why do both. Just saying, I am going to make without the powders, wish me luck.

Brittany

Monday 11th of March 2019

What is the serving size so that I can figure out calories, etc?

Marcia

Monday 29th of October 2018

I second the request for listing macros. We’ve used this fabulous recipe for Whole 30 (and ever since!) since last November, and now are transitioning to Keto and would LOVE LOVE LOVE to have macros listed! PLEEEEeeeeessse?!

Cybele Blood

Thursday 20th of September 2018

Absolutely a strong NO on the water-bath canning meat. ONLY pressure canning is safe for meat according to any canning source material. Also, please consider ALTITUDE in the canning times. Altitude lengthens safe canning times. The risk of severe illness from improperly canned food is high, so please before canning anything, research from several official canning sources. Likewise, do not water-bath alkaline foods. So, no mushrooms or zucchini, if you like to add these to your sauce. Often when canning plain tomatoes it is even recommended to add a little lemon juice or other acidifier for safety, because some tomatoes are more acidic than others. So please do follow readily available safety precautions for canning. Nobody wants botulism; it still can kill and does hospitalize in modern times. That being said, canning is a wonderful kitchen skill, and allows the bounty of the harvest season to extend well through winter without mega-freezer space. I canned up a few types of paleo peach butters this week, and have to can a lot of tomatoes this weekend. Cheers!

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